In addition to improving the menstrual cycle, Ketogenic Diet had the additional benefits of reducing blood glucose and body weight, improving liver function, and treating fatty liver compared to traditional pharmacological treatment in women with PCOS and liver dysfunction who were obese.

Abstract

Aim: To evaluate the effect of a ketogenic diet (KD) in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and liver dysfunction who were obese.

Methods: Women with PCOS and liver dysfunction who were obese were enrolled in this prospective, open-label, parallel-group, controlled pilot trial, and randomly received KD (KD group) or conventional pharmacological treatment (Essentiale plus Yasmin, control group) in a 1:1 ratio for 12 weeks. The primary endpoint was the liver function markers. Secondary endpoints included the menstrual cycle, anthropometric characteristics, body composition, hormonal levels, and metabolic biomarkers.

Results: Of the 20 eligible participants enrolled, 18 participants completed the study. The KD group reported a significant reduction in anthropometric characteristics and body composition from baseline to week 12 (all p < 0.05). In addition, there were significant reductions in menstrual cycle, plasma estradiol, and progesterone levels in two groups (all p < 0.05), but no significant between-group difference was observed. KD significantly reduced the liver function markers compared with control group (p < 0.05). The signs of fatty liver disappeared in six out of seven fatty liver participants in KD group after 12 weeks of intervention, while only one of 10 fatty liver participants in control group disappeared.

Conclusions:In addition to improving the menstrual cycle, KD had the additional benefits of reducing blood glucose and body weight, improving liver function, and treating fatty liver compared to traditional pharmacological treatment in women with PCOS and liver dysfunction who were obese.

Li, Jian et al. “Ketogenic diet in women with polycystic ovary syndrome and liver dysfunction who are obese: A randomized, open-label, parallel-group, controlled pilot trial.” The journal of obstetrics and gynaecology research vol. 47,3 (2021)

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